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monti's back and forth on resignation casts uncertainty over italy's economic and political future. >> we begin the show with what has been a day of celebration for the european union. >> the three senior figures representing the eu have been in the norwegian capital, oslo, to collect the nobel peace prize. it was awarded to the 27-member bloc for six decades of promoting peace, democracy, and human rights. >> however, not everyone is happy. some have asked whether the price is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial -- the prize is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial crisis. desmond tutu says it is an organization based on military force. >> coveted award was accepted with pride by the eu's 3 president, martin schulz, herman van rompuy, and jose manuel barroso. the standing ovation they received was a rare accolade for the eu in these tough economic times. >> in light of the financial crisis that is affecting so many innocent people, we can see that the political framework in which the union is rooted is more importan
headlines from around the world. political turmoil in italy sending european stocks lower. italian banks leading the way down as mario monte keeps investors guessing in whether he'll run against sylvia berlusconi next year. the unexpected drop signals continued pressure from abroad. and meeting face-to-face, president obama and house speaker john boehner sit down for a one-on-one over the weekend. there are just three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he
moment in italy. berlusconi has announced he's creating a new center right grouping. meanwhile, mario monti has been accused oversimplifying solutions during the fiscal crisis. carolin is joining us now from rome. do we expect more of this rhetoric today? >> oh, definitely. not just today, but specifically over two months. elections will only be held probably on february 24th. we've got about two months of the silly campaigning season to follow. so yes, as you said, the verbal exchange is definitely heating up. it started with mr. monti's response criticism coming from officials about his renewed request for the prime minister post yesterday. he said this criticism was out of place. it was offensive not just for him, but also for all of the people in italy who have the freedom to vote. this morning, he did an interview with one of the channels here in italy and he said, i don't really care about this spread because the spread is based on fraud. that's the direct translation. meanwhile, if you take a look at the spread, they are moving higher again. 4.9%. italian equity markets are mov
. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell says there's still time for an agreement. >> republicans aren't likely to sign a blank check just because we fin
a look at the bond curve. spain, this will be a good proxy for now. we'll get the ten year for italy in just a second. 35.34% is the level there. u.s. benefiting from fund flows well. choppy trade across the picture here. let's look at the italian curve before we get the results later today. we are seeing green across the board, so yields dipping before that probably has more to do with the political rhetoric we're seeing especially coming from berlusconi. under 4.6% for the ten-year and on the short and two, a bit of a rally. finally, let's close taking a look at the forex. euro/dollar is weaker. and it's holding just above 1.30. and the dollar/yen, this is the one sixuan mentioned to watch. heading into japanese elections, stocks outperform adding oots .1% to 83.35 this morning. >>> south korea's central bank may be worried about factors in the economy, but the dok says the economy is stronger than it used to be. more on that next. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp o
. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book in a little increase again, but important is here, not only the expectation part of the index but also that we ge
secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is saying. >> they're saying saudi arabia figures saying we produce less. now the i.a. saying they produc
through the first ter. there will be a rocky road possibly driven by news from italy in the latter part of february. so i'd be long now, but i would -- on that position. >> and we'll get into more of on that in just a minute. allen will stay with us. if you have any questions, send them in. worldwide@cnbc.com. if you want to share your thoughts, say hello here on this quiet christmas week. we would appreciate that, too. >>> a ja toyota has agreed to settle a class action lawsuit. customers brought the case against toyota claiming certain models accelerated unintentionally. 16 million vehicles will be covered by this action. it includes the camry and corolla. the nikkei generally speaking was higher this morning. >>> the season of good will seems to have tech firms bye. this amid claims that ericsson breached a number of samsung patents. >>> now let's check in on markets. it's time to look at the heat map. and we have green, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker se
pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations between europe and russia. >> european demands for russia to separate gas companies and distribution channels have so far had no effect. and the russian leader was not prepared to take the criticism lying down. >> my good friend explained his position at such great length and with such a motion because he has a feeling he is in the wrong. >> the ongoing disputes about energy and trade are taking their toll on the you-russian relations. >> italy's prime minister has resigned. this move paves the way for elections to be held as early as february. mario monti has promised to hand in his resignation -- or had promised to hand in his resignation as soon as parliament passed a 2013 budget, which he led his -- kept his promise. he led a government of technocrats for the past year. europeans had held his economic reforms, but voters have been les
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
% and 1.6%. there's also no political crisis in italy by the way. support has been withdrawn for the group run by monti. berlusconi hinted he may return to politics after stepping down last year. claudia joins us in milan. a number of reports suggested this may not upset investors too much just because we were going to have elections anyway, it doesn't bring it forward a lot earlier. is that the sense that you're getting? >> yes, it doesn't really change in terms of the timing. it just gives you an idea, though, of where berlusconi stands and what the situation is like within that central right next. the pdl has made it clear that there is a serious disagreement within the party. they were set to go forward with some primaries which is what the center left did to elect their candidate. and now that berlusconi has abruptly announced that he's going back, that tells you there is a lot of tension. he's trying to define the support, enough support in order to have some say in parliament even after the elections. an apparently he probably was not able to get that within his own party. as far as
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
in italy. that's something angela merkel could support. although she might have to face her own transition to the left as we face elections in september. it's hoped mario monti would stand again and would stay in place because clearly that was the sort of work in progress that worked well. down with the euro and italy has to walk its own way. that is not something that we would like to hear in the eu eurozone or in berlin. >> silvia, thank you so much for your time. >>> now, a weak ahead of the person of the year, the winner, north korean leader kim jong un. the magazine didn't admit that various online campaigns were at work to influence the vote. not necessarily a legitimate tell on who readers would like to see as person of the year. so we're going to cast our own poll on "worldwide exchange." who is your pick for person of the year? e-mails us here, tweet us. i think ross westgate gets my nod. we'll see if maybe he comes out ahead in our unofficial reader poll. staying on that topic, the financial times has named its person of the year. we'll tell you who it is and talk to the newspape
that means but italy has its own laws as you know, probably as well as anybody. but he wants -- he'd like to continue to run the show because he feels just like mario draghi that he's been very successful and he can't let go of the reins. now i understand that. but he doesn't want to run. >> he's been very successful and he tells us about that. >> right. >> he had his july 26th surprise between him and mario draghi but in the end as you pointed out off camera he doesn't want to lose. he's not going through the process in a way where he can lose. basically if you appoint me i'll take it. >> right. >> i think president obama or any politician in the u.s. would love to have those terms up. >> right. he wants the terms. no election. i don't want that process. i don't want the feeling of rejection but i'd like to continue in this path. italy has to make a decision and i think the big money will line up behind him. we see the reactions when berlusconi was on the rise for those two days the bond market got trashed again in italy and he's been out there talking this morning anyway. >> switching g
of work. things are not quite that grim in italy, but more and more young people are looking for work. the youth unemployment rate is 36%, the highest since june 2004. >> we have to take a short break, but when we back, december 1 is world aids day. we will be taking a look at the problem of hiv/aids. >> and what is germany going to do with all its nuclear waste? stay with us for that. >> thanks for staying with us. >> welcome back. one of the consequences of the breakdown of public services in the wake of the economic crisis in greece is a sharp spike up people they're infected with aids. >> on the eve of world aids day, officials are warning infection rate could get out of control unless action is taken. >> but as a new report just issued by the united nations shows, there is encouraging news. there's been a large reduction in the amount of new cases in southern africa. >> education campaigns and easier access to medicines have paid off in the battle against hiv. the number of people newly infected with the virus has dropped by 70% in malawi, botswana, and namibia in the past decade
. one, there's always political risk. in italy, you do have elections coming up. there's a chance getting a higher share than people anticipate. but even then, the financial forces are going to force any government that comes into power to more or less stick to the plan morsi set out. on the other hand, there's always spain, the worries that with 25% unemployment, that you would see the default rate particularly on residential mortgages shoot up, it's 3% now, which is pretty amazing given the struggles within the economy, but we think it will go up somewhat, but really not any more than people have already priced in. >> and then ten year yields, 5.24%. at the moment, relatively speaking, pretty comfortable. >> maybe a little bit too comfortable and we certainly don't want to get complace complacent.yields are where they were say in march of this year and then subsequently they shot up to 7.5%. we know with the draghi put that that won't happen, but we don't want to think that there is only one way -- >> yesterday said, look, sort of the idea of the risk on phrase, certainly for --
connection? >> greece and italy are also on the list. year after year, the country's perform the poorest -- the countries perform the poorest. greece pays many more bribes per year and higher amounts than anywhere else in europe. in those countries, public institutions need to change. we need financial accountability to citizenry. >> denmark is the least corrupt country. what does germany need to do to improve its position? >> the world is waiting for more attention to the u.n. convention against corruption. that means ratification. it is not ok that germany has not ratified this treaty. it is important to look at some of the other activities that politicians and those in the justice system are involved in. it is important to know about that in terms of complex of interest that may emerge in their public sector -- of conflict of interest that may emerge in their public-sector work. >> eu anti-trust regulators have imposed fines on alleged cartel of -- on an alleged cartel of electronics companies. >> tv sets with cathode ray tubes are not new anymore. the past has come back to haunt some
at greece, but also they're watching the problems in italy. the news that mariom onti -- monti will step down. that's really dragging down the mood. >> let's look at some market numbers. dax closing up. stoxx 50 at 2624. the dow jones is currently up almost 1%. the euro is trading at $1.3007. >> agrees has reached their target in a bond buyback scheme, at least they are calling to the state tv. >> they bought the bonds at a discount of 70% from investors and the private banks. this was a condition for them to receive further eu funds. finance ministers are set to meet to discuss releasing the bailout funds. british banking giant hsbc has agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion to settle a money- laundering case. investigated by authorities in the united states. >> hsbc was accused of using the u.s. financial system to transfer funds from mexican drug cartels and from countries like iran that had been placed under international sanctions. >> the u.s. government says hsbc invaded these practices. they've have been said to enabled terrorists and others to ensure bent sanctions. despite the heft
in italy, spain, and france proved especially wary. only britain bucked the trend with a rise in new car sales. a decade it has been since the inclusion of the german media empire. the state appellate court in munich today ruled that deutsche bank must pay damages to the heirs of the deceased mogul. >> the court ruled that the former ceo of deutsche bank, seen here, was responsible for the collapse of the world's largest licenser of film rights. in an interview, this credit worthiness was question, driving the conglomerate into bankruptcy. damages are expected to range anywhere from 120 million euros to 1.25 billion euros. it was also a big topic at the frankfurt stock exchange today. our market correspondent gave us this report from the trading floor. >> for the deutsche bank, this verdict is more than just a verdict because it weighs heavily on the image of germany's biggest bank. also because of the fact that the trial is not the only one that the deutsche bank is faced with, and some analysts are fearing now that investors might lose their confidence in dutch bank and sell their shar
to the german chancellor more. >> president francois hollande, together with italy and spain, pushed back against germany's strict austerity plans for europe. the amended year, there was a sense that germany might cut in its place, the southern european countries were going to build up a counterbalance, but that has not really been borne out. especially since hollande never followed through with his drive to renegotiate the fiscal pact. that did not happen. >> for germany, that meant sticking to the status quo. chancellor merkel met with the greek prime minister in october. she made it clear that austerity remains the number one priority, but her message is not popular with the greek people. >>>> i know that these reforms demand a lot from people in those countries that are especially hard hit by the crisis, but the efforts are not for nothing. they are worth it. the reforms are working. >> one has to admit that chancellor merkel is very successful in pushing through her own agenda, weather you like it or not. she makes compromises, but at the end of the day, germany's positions are visib
as it was at the beginning of the year, but the eu faces problems in 2013 as well -- a new election in italy could put silvio berlusconi back in power, and france's francois hollande has to tackle urgent issues at home, so there is plenty of work for europ's firefighters next year. >> the past year, we have often brought you images of very angry protests in greece that were mostly against the harsh austerity measures imposed by the government in return for a bailout funds from lenders. >> without this, greece would certainly have gone bankrupt, but it still a long way from clear that the bailout and the reforms they are tied to will get the economy back on the road to recovery. >> meanwhile, the suffering continues for the greek people. the situation is especially dire in rural villages. >> we are on our way to a village on the border with bulgaria. most of the village's 500 inhabitants are muslim -- a minority in the orthodox christian country. the village also claims the dubious distinction of being the poorest village in greece, with an average income of roughly 6000 euros a year. >> everything is being c
the road, which is rich coming from a european. >>> european trading the lower this morning. italy's prime minister mario monti, yes, the same one that is famous from all the anti-trust things back in the -- was that the '90s? >> the '90s, yeah. >> monti announcing he'll step down before his term ends. the decision comes after the party of sylvia berlusconi withdrew support for monti's government last week. berlusconi has indicated he will run for leadership again. cnbc's carolin roth will join us from italy with the latest in a few minutes. when i was over there, i had to have the -- all the political signs translated because there's a picture of monti sitting under a beach chair drinking a drink and all the text was send monti to the beach. they already didn't like him. >> he had very high disapproval ratings. i remember last summer i had seen that somewhere. >> they want to send him to the beach. the major european averages at this hour, there they, they're all down. not great in france, but germany down about .7% and the ftse down fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback fo
roughly speaking in the likes of italy and france and actually grew for germany. then in q4, it seems that there is a greater degree of destocking i think, materializing. i think that is going to lead to some weakness on the industrial production side and it does appear that the austerity is very much perceived by household and by service sector companies. and that explains this relatively soft data. it's a sign that really we are still in a period of multi-year major fiscal entrenchment and at the same time, we have a very cautious perspective towards taking on debt. both by the suppliers and the demanders of that debt. >> julian, very briefly, will we see more qe? will we see any more next year or not? >> well, it will depend, i think, on how things develop. on our baseline forecast, the answer to that would be no because we are looking for recovery coming through really reasonably significantly from the first quarter of next year with .4% quarter on quarter. >> julian, thanks for that. always good to see you. julian kelly joining us from barclays. which country is more corrupt and
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
than the united states. i mean, countries like spain, italy -- >> the austerity policy. when you look at the country -- >> countries like spain and italy -- >> i'm talking about the labor market adjustments. >> they have seen 20%. that's a problem. >> i'm sorry. i didn't hear -- what did you say? >> spain, italy, unemployment around 15, 20%. >> of course they do. >> juliet, hang on, because it is connected to the german point. part of the reason that germany has been able to have export-led growth and be so successful internally, germany is the china of europe. >> i realize that. i made that point about 20 minutes ago. you add shock at the beginning. i'm not talking about the later stage of austerity and self-imposed pain, which is what europe is dealing with right now. but if you look at the ocb adjustment to the downturn and the u.s. has a huge g and p adjustment and loss of unemployment where a lot of these other european countries adjust on hours and their unemployment doesn't go up. that's the only point i was making. >> adjust on hours meaning you get something more like job sha
was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens when italy -- it turns out you had to take it down. i know that john corzine, very controversial figure. that's a code word. but what a trade they almost had. in the news again today. >> almost. >> horseshoes, hand grenades. >> we should point out, gm was certainly not having the easiest of times of it. this morning's stock is up sharply, we're telling you why. the company will buy back at a premium to at least what was the market price as of yesterday, 200 million shares from the government at $27.50. that having the effect of sending the stock above that. why not, if you're gm, you've got all this cash sitting on your balance sheet. you're earning virtually nothing on it, why not take the opportunity, even at a premium, to buy it back by as much as 11%, shrinking the cap by that much. we heard from tim massad who runs t.a.r.p., they'll be dribbling out the shares over time. the next 12 to 15 months. similar to the strategy employed with citi. a bit of it coming out. and finally they cleaned it up with a few big blocks. >> that was v
,000. fears it could be devastating as the storm that killed more than 1200 people last year. >>> well, italy a painting by leonardo da vinci stolen decades ago has been returned. taken from naples back in 1940. it made its way to the black market and went through switzerland, germany, the united states before ending up in a museum in japan. the museum agreed to return it to italy after hammering out a joint custody agreement. >>> well, when we come back, the pictures that caught our attention. don't miss that. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you on
class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chief strategist from loop capital markets. chris, good morning. we wake up without a deal. what does that mean? what are you watching today? >> good morning, kelly. the thing i'm watching most specifically is the vix. i think the vix is the most distilled measure of risk that we have in the marketplace right now. we've noticed that the vix has gone from a fairly low range of 12 to 14. we're up over 20 now, which to me is an area of concern. if we begin to move higher, once again, i think we should watch out for market-based effects. >> we have, as you mentioned, started to see that outperformer. it's interesting in a year when the vix is tamed we haven't seen more volatility. in fact, as you look out at some of
. europe's economic problems are straining ancient fault lines. northern italy recent having ineffective bailout of neighbors. there's an irony. if you apply that across the continent, the eurozone itself would fall apart, perhaps starting with the departure of germany. by the way, if we applied that logic in america, states like new york, california, connecticut could point out they in effect subsidize states like alabama, mississippi, montana, states ironically the most fervent advocates of state rights and small government. >>> up next, we'll take you into the heart of darkness, one of africa's most troubled nations has taken a turn for the worse. back in a moment. who do you think i am, quicken loans? at quicken loans, we'll provide you with myql mobile. this amazingly useful app allows you to take pictures of your mortgage documents using an iphone or android smart phone... so you can easily send them to us. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ooh, la-la! one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident...
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
, they send an airplane over to benghazi and they returned to tripoli -- instead of going to italy or to germany -- then the c-17 has to come -- it makes no sense. it makes absolutely no sense. >> greta: the irony and i have no sympathy for the administration's claiming this is politicized because if they would just simply answer these questions, not drag their feet, maybe we will get it in the next 6 or 7 days, but if they would fill in the blanks, nobody would be suspicious. we get silly answers that don't make sense -- that's the problem. that is created by those who hold the facts. >> that's right! i am not trying to politicize this. we have injured americans! in the worst case ttakes 25 hours to extract them to a facility, an american facility, they're in germany. at the best case, maybe 18 hours and the administration won't answer those questions. these are legitimate questions. i want to talk to that family. they deserve to have answers. we have to make sure this never, ever happens again. when an american goes down, we go get him. this president didn't do that. >> greta: if
my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be able to sustain anything meaningful? >> this is a very good question. whether or not the civilian efforts are sustainable, it depends on whether or not the civilians are empowered to meet the needs are not. i work with a supreme assembly. what i know about the council is not based on my filtered to allow bela lot of. -- based on my relationship with aleppo. one of the main challenges they are facing is this empowerment components. they have ambitious projects. in the security committee in of did not want the fsa to control the liberated areas. to do this they appointed a brigadier general. i met with him. he wanted to start a com
and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on the weakening of the yen which we can show you on hopes that that will help the japanese corporate sector. remember, we saw export figures showing a drop of 20% in exports to the use. 15% to china. again, there's a lot of expectation built to this. the aussie/dollar remains the underperformer as we continue to evaluate china's internal rebalancing. now the sterling is stronger, the dollar/yen you already mentioned. and the euro/dollar to get back to the point about the ifo survey is adding .3% to 132.-- 1.3274. we ge
war was the first to see the future. the fascist rose to power in italy, then germany, then a samara totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can wr
, we had to baja, the bp oil spill, nuclear meltdown, debt downgrades, greece, italy, spain, foreclosures, student loans, how many things do we have to get fearful about before we start to believe in this economy? it is not booming. i am not saying it is perfect, not saying it is 1980s again, is not but is growing 2% per year, maybe 2.2, two.three, and it keeps growing. we have not had a recession since march of 2009. >> it is media granddad as almost people feel. if we take the consumer back and put them in the jobs report we did see the number of hours increase as did wages. what do you make of that? does that give you hope? >> it does. if you look at car sales in november, automobile sales, fifteen million vehicles were sold in november. highest since december of 2007. that weakness we saw in cars and auto sales in october and retail sales, i think because of sandy it is going to be over. november and december will be great month for the consumer. i do have hope. i don't think we're going to boom. we won't grow 4% we will grow between 2% and 3% real growth next year in 20
back as we're talking, rallied back quite a bit in the ten-year bond futures in italy but you know what, politics aside, mario draghi bought himself and europe some time. i don't know what they'll do with it, it will be 2013's story. >> you nailed it, to me every strategy since the crisis hit in this country in my opinion you could call it kick the can but it's about we have no idea what the effects are going to be, what the exit will be or if any of this is going to work but trying to buy time for something to happen. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >>
germany, italy, england, and austria from staalin and his successors even though they are now strong enough to meet a threat which in fact doesn't exist. i just had my very able aid marcus rose check this for me. over the last ten years we have spent $3.8 billion in medicare. that's true. during that same period we spent $5.6 billion on the military. the military has been going up fast faster and it includes an awful lot of expenditure, unnecessary. we're reading today that canada is recoring whether they're going to buy the f-35. the f-35 is a very, very well conceived airplane that's proving to be a great financial disaster. if any agency, the decht housing, the department of education, the department of energy, had a disaster as remotely expensive to the taxpayer as the f-35 my conservative friends would be screaming. so yeah, i agree with them. ironically. that's one area where the republicans want to spend more, where mitt romney criticizes the president for not spending enough. and i'm very encouraged, ed, that in this last election for the first time in my memory a democratic
plunged across northern and central italy and snow has blanketed switzerland. serbians are struggling with brutal weather as residents cross snow covered streets and cars try to maneuver slippery roads. >> in our 11 insta-weather plus forecast with ava marie. >> what a different story here as we're seeing rainfall across the metro area. a live look from skycam right now. it was foggy earlier on and the rain has picked up, helping clear the fog. you can see the rain drops on the camera. something to watch out for if you're going out this morning. dealing with fog and rain drops, as well, making the roads slick this morning. on the radar, scattered showers along the baltimore metro area including around the beltway, parts of 95 and 83, as well. west of us, the rain is more wide spread and heavier, as well, especially as you see yellow shading west of gathures burg, hagerstown, as well. this will be shifting north and east throughout the day so rain could be picking up in baltimore the next couple of hours. zooming out right now, a stationary front sitting over us. i was talking about th
their verdict? and the answer is this. the latest 10 year bond rate for italy is 4.5%, france 2%, just over in fact, and the british bonds are only 1.8%. it's the markets the count and not the party that caused the problem in the first place. [shouting] >> my honorable friend reminds us that we do get a daily verdict on the credibility of our economic policy from bond investors and we're borrowing money more deeply than anyone has done my job before us. there's a real benefit for taxpayers and members of the public in that. we have saved 33 billion pounds in debt interest that we are forecast to have to pay in 2010, and as i said in my statement that is more than the entire defense budget. >> dennis skinner. >> [inaudible] just like on previous occasions like in 2010, when he made his first statement, when it was stripped bare it was a totally different story. then in 2010 he promised -- [inaudible], and here we are two and a half years later, call the national health service. [inaudible] never changes. now, instead of being -- [inaudible] now as chancellor of the exchequer he wrecks the ec
't affect the millionaires. they had to dial back. in france, of course, in all these countries and italy and other countries excise tax. they went in first. the cuts came after that, whatever meager cuts. that was growth of the growth off the growth. melissa: right. >> the lesson to be learned from europe isn't to be careful on cutting. it is to be careful on hike being, on hiking taxes. the beast is the government, in my opinion here. the beast is the government. you don't reward the beast by giving it more food, more dollars. that's what i near is going on here. melissa: yeah. lori: the president's desire to get rid of the debt ceiling limit at all, what kind of ramifications, what could happen? are we looking at another debt downgrade? a second downgrade could be really, really -- >> here is what i agree with him. this charade we go through every few months on the debt limit. republican presidents, democratic presidents, mark zandi from moody's it does damage our credibility. i agree to something like that. i didn't like fiat saying i will handle the debt thing. that would be like let
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